Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy 2016/17

Pupil Premium Funding:

The pupil premium is a form of funding in addition to main school funding, to address the current underlying inequalities between children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and their peers, by ensuring that funding to tackle disadvantage reaches the pupils who need it most.

The Pupil Premium is allocated directly to schools. It is for schools to decide how the funding will be spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils for whom they are responsible. The funding is allocated to schools per FSM pupil. The intended outcome is to close the attainment gap between them and their peers.  

Disadvantaged Pupils

Schools currently receive £1320 per disadvantaged child (defined as having had free school meals within the last 6 years or being in care). 

Pupils from Service Families

Pupils from Service families also attract Pupil Premium funding at the level of £300 per child.  This money is to be used to support pupils’ emotional needs, for example during times of parental deployment or during a move to, or away from our school.

 

Our Pupil Premium Strategy

The Pupil Premium is allocated to children from low-income families who are currently known to be eligible for FSM in both mainstream and non-mainstream settings and children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months.

The level of the premium in 2015-2016 is £1320 per pupil for pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM

based on the January 2015 Census, and for pupils in care who have been continuously looked after for six months.

In 2013-14 eligibility for the Pupil Premium was extended to pupils who have been eligible for free school meals (FSM) at any point in the last 6 years.

At  Moorside Junior School, we recognise that learning to learn skills (metacognition) form a fundamental bedrock for all children. Our curriculum is designed to meet the needs of current cohorts and is delivered in a flexible manner to engage all children.

We take time to know our children and understand their individual needs, enabling us to identify those at risk of falling behind and those who need additional support to broaden aspirations and love learning.

Through our monitoring of children we identify those who are:-

  • Socially disadvantaged
  • Have members of their family serving in the armed forces
  • Finding aspects of their lives emotionally challenging

We recognise that not all pupils who receive Pupil Premium Funding will be socially disadvantaged. Likewise, not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for Pupil Premium Funding. (We aim to provide additional support as necessary for these children from the school’s delegated budget and not from Pupil Premium Funding).

Our Aim: To close the achievement gap by ensuring that any pupil at risk of underachieving are identified early so that support and intervention is provided for those pupils (In particular those that are on FSM or Looked After Children).

North Yorkshire have their own evidence base on effective strategies to raise achievement and close the gap to support the work in schools in ‘supporting the attainment of disadvantaged pupils’.

At Moorside, in addition to our pupil premium, we have an exciting funded opportunity to work in a collaborative partnership with schools across the county. This will build on the good work already happening in our school through an ‘Achievement Unlocked’ Collaborative Partnership. This is being led by Marc Rowland, Deputy Director of the National Education Trust, a leading pupil premium consultant with much successful experience of working with schools and local authorities.

The details of the main barriers to educational achievement and how the allocation will be spent to address these areas are outlined in depth through our ‘Achievement Unlocked’ action plan. This also details how the school will measure the impact of the pupil premium when this strategy is reviewed in October 2016.

To summarise, the schools priorities are:

  • Raise aspirations for achievement for children, staff and parents. (This will include training staff to understand and embed a Growth Mindset culture with a firm belief that all children will achieve).
  • To improve the children’s Meta-cognition (strategies to learn effectively).
  • Encourage all children to be kind, caring and willingly engage in school through improved lunchtime experiences and embedded use of restorative practice
  • Embed a culture of collaboration and improvement for all staff across school.

PROPOSED SPEND (Allocation) FOR

PUPIL PREMIUM funding £36,300 2015-2016

(25 FSM and 11 service children)

Strategy

Particular target group

Year group

Number of children

Estimated cost % of total PP funding

Provide 6 classes to reduce numbers in class to maximum of 26 and deliver personalised support in class

All children

 

All

All

£6,250   (17%)

Pastoral Officer/Behaviour mental to provide emotional support  and develop academic ability and to facilitate the development of positive relationships with pupils and their families

All children

All

All

£16,000 (44%)

Wolf Brother Project

Outdoor activity specialists from East Barnby provide a nurturing project to develop ambition, resilience and collaboration for children in Year 5

All children

5

5

£5000    (14%)

Opportunities to develop new learning skills through music from an equal baseline. This provides children with a platform to perform and grow in confidence

All pupil premium children

All

16

£2250    (7%)

Use evidenced based early intervention programmes for reading, writing, maths and social and emotional aspects of learning

 

All pupil premium children who are identified as vulnerable and at risk of not making expected progress.

All

14

420 hours of 1:1 interventions with ATA/GTA

£3360     (9%)

Improve the effective use of teaching assistants to have greater impact on learning outcomes for children in class.

All children

All

All

Training and management time

£1000     (3%)

Subsidies for school visits

Pupil premium children

All

ALl

£600   (2%)

 

 

 

 

£ 34,460 (95%)

 

 

How our PUPIL PREMIUM funding was spent- academic year:  2014-2015

Total allocation: £31,600

 (26 FSM and 11 service children)

Strategy

Particular target group

Year group

Number of children

Actual cost

Provide 6 classes to reduce numbers in class to maximum of 26 and deliver personalised support in class

 

All children

 

All

All

£6,300  

Opportunities to develop new learning skills through music from an equal baseline. This provides children with a platform to perform and grow in confidence

All pupil premium children

All

16

£3,420

Wolf Brother Project

Outdoor activity specialists from East Barnby provide a nurturing project to develop ambition, resilience and collaboration for children in Year 5

 

All children

5

32

 £5,000

Online subscription for Readings Eggs to improve provision and materials to support reading and spelling

All pupil premium children

All

All

£439.20

Subsidies for school visits and extracurricular activities

Pupil premium children

All

All

£600

Intervention numeracy boosts for Year 6 children to boost pupil premium children to make better than expected progress with SENCO release time to monitor

Pupil premium children

6

All

Interventions with booster teacher –

£1000

 

 

Additional lunchtime intervention support to provide counselling and small group activities

Pupil premium children

All

All

£1764

Emotional and social support 1:1 and small group

All

All

All

£3528

TA Training Reading Intervention Course Costs

All

All

All

£1000

Additional TA to promote wellbeing 1:1 for 3 pupil premium children

Pupil Premium Children

All

All

£10,000

 

 

 

 

£33051.20

 

The Impact of the PPG for 2014/15

End of KS2 results :

 

The percentage of PPF pupils making 2 levels progress in reading, writing and maths was varied across the small group of children.  Levels of ability and additional needs, together with three new starters during and at the end of the previous year, also influenced the results.

 

In year progress for this group of children was higher for reading, (4.8 APP compared with 2.7 for the non PPG children).  The PPG made less progress in writing, with a gap of 1.4, but with no gap for maths.

 

Reading

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Pupil Premium

2.7

3.0

2.3

Non PP   (28)

4.8

3.6

3.1

 

Writing

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Pupil Premium

1.0

1.7

4.0

Non PP

1.4

3.3

3.4

 

Maths

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Pupil Premium

2.3

2.3

2.7

Non PP

3.4

3.2

3.2

 

 

    • Teachers and leadership track children in receipt of the PPG individually, in order to work on specific barriers to learning.  Other impact measures demonstrate that the school has started to implement more targeted interventions, for reading and health and emotional wellbeing.
  • The use of Reading Eggs has supported some of the children struggling to develop reading fluency.  The impact for this has again been varied for the group.  Some children have made more significant gains than others.  The school has decided not continue with this intervention, having identified some more suitable resources to ensure children make more rapid progress with reading.
  • In year 5, where children had a learning skills development programme with East Barnby Outdoor Centre, progress in writing and maths was better than in previous years.  However, only progress in writing exceeded the non PPG children’s progress.  Since the programme, learning behaviours for the cohort have continued to improve:

 

Outcomes

Teacher observations and case studies

The pupils completed an entry and exit questionnaire. 

The majority of students had an improved score from the entry assessment. The lowest improved score was one; the highest was 30. Seven students had a lower exit questionnaire score than their entry score, ranging from -2 to -21.

The question that scored the lowest in the entry questionnaire was 'I keep focused, and sustain my attention, sometimes getting slightly distracted' with a total of 103, an average score of 2.86. This had improved by a total of 27 points in the exit questionnaire to 130.

Parent and children’s personal reflections of the activities were all extremely positive, and not necessarily captured in the questionnaire.  The observational impact was far more powerful.  Children are more flexible and independent in school.  As a cohort they are beginning to demonstrate much greater responsibility for themselves and have a sense of ownership about the school.

Key findings based on observations, case studies, student and parent questionnaires and feedback information.

 

  • Improved relationships with peers and adults
  • Improved levels of concentration
  • Better understanding of what resilience, risk-taking and trust means
  • Development of reflectiveness
  • Improved listening skills and acceptance of different viewpoints
  • Improved ability to lead and be led
  • Increased levels of self sufficiency
  • Willingness to take responsibility and to trust adults
  • Improved relationships with parents

Summary:

The project has been pivotal in developing children’s ability to take on challenge, support one another and use critical feedback to improve.  Their attitudes to learning have, for the majority, improved. 

Funds have been identified in the school’s budget to repeat the project in 2015/ 2016.